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Obscene message in a bottle found on a dirty beach | Wired Cola

Obscene message in a bottle found on a dirty beach

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IMG_0904.JPG I guess we should have expected it, really. On May 15 we hiked to Marmari (Μαρμαρι) Beach, a 2 hour round trip on rough, hilly paths (plus half an hour of swimming and beachcombing).

Our reward was nice swimming and the filthiest beach I have ever seen. I don't directly blame anyone.

It seems that certain beaches are just well-positioned to catch every bit of floatsam around, and this is one of them: the litter on the beach was surely not the result of visitors to the beach, as the character of the debris wasn't right: not enough broken liquor bottles, too much stuff that looked like it washed overboard: milk crates, orphaned sandals, broken up plastic bits of just about anything imaginable, what looked like a marine transponder or radio, and so forth.

By comparison, the neighboring beaches of Lia and Grammata have magnitudes less litter on them, and are just as attractive to visitors, if not more so.

We picked up a lot of interesting shells and rocks, and a message in a bottle, seen in the photo above.

We didn't open it until we got home, which was just as well. It was mostly in Greek, dated five days before we retrieved it, and probably didn't travel far, since it indicated the authors were headed to Piraeus (the port of Athens; the most frequented ferry route from Syros).

It was so obscene that after the first sentence, TLO's dad was unwilling to translate it. The gist was a series of insults aimed at the reader, along with the admonition in English at the end that "if you are foreigner do not translate it! We are Greeks."

Astoundingly, the authors of the message (Alexandros and Nikos) left phone numbers. Note I don't say they left their phone numbers, since I feel that would be an unwarranted assumption given the evidence.

So there you go. Our Greek adventures continue apace. Despite the dirty beach and the dirty message in a bottle, the swimming was a treat: the water was clean. The hike was pretty serious, but we had fun.